November 2017 Field Visit – Marrambidya Wetlands

Hello lovely readers!

My ‘being less busy in November’ turned into ‘being sick and then getting busy again in November’, so I didn’t manage to get anywhere all month. Until this evening.

This evening I finally found the secret entrance to Marrambidya Wetlands in Wagga Wagga.

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May 2017 Field Visit – Fivebough Swamp

I wasn’t going to do another wetland for a few months, because I feel like I do wetlands a lot, but a friend of mine told me that Fivebough Swamp was spectacular at the moment, so I decided that was too good to pass up, and off to Leeton I went. As coincidence would have it, I ran into the same friend and her sister while I was there, and we spent a while wandering along together before parting ways.

Fivebough Swamp on a fine late-autumn day
Fivebough Swamp on a fine late-autumn day

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January 2017 Field Visit – Yarradda Lagoon

Welcome to 2017!

My year got off to an exciting start when I was contacted by someone from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) asking me if I’d like to visit one of their environmental watering project sites with some field officers doing a wetlands health survey. Naturally I said yes, and so last Tuesday I headed to Yarradda lagoon (within the Yarrada precinct of the Murrumbidgee Valley National Park) near Darlington Point with four field officers: two from OEH and two from Charles Sturt University (CSU).

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December 2016 Field Visit – Campbell’s Swamp

I was at a loss as to where to visit for my final field trip of 2016, when a friend on Twitter unwittingly provided inspiration:

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So off to Griffith I went to visit Campbell’s Swamp.

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ACT Field Visit Part Two – Jerrabomberra Wetlands

As mentioned in my previous post, I visited Canberra this weekend with my parents. After attending a night tour at Mulligans Flat we decided to visit Jerrabomberra Wetlands the following morning.

It was quite windy, so we weren’t sure if we’d see many birds, but we were delighted to find several families of ducks, swans and swamphens, including fuzzy babies of assorted species.

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ACT Field Visit – Mulligans Flat

This weekend my parents invited me to visit Canberra with them. After a look around the National Museum of Australia, we headed out to a night tour at Mulligans Flat.

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Mulligans Flat Woodland Sanctuary is an area of remnant Box Gum Grassy Woodland that is being managed to conserve and restore the entire ecological community at all levels. Non-native predators are actively excluded, rabbits are gradually being eradicated from within the reserve, and several locally-extinct native species have been reintroduced over the past few years, including Eastern Bettongs, Eastern Quolls, New Holland Mice, Bush Stone Curlews, and others. There are a large number of other native species living within the reserve as well.

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October 2016 Field Visit – Fivebough Swamp in flood

I must confess to a spot of laziness this month. With plenty of time available, and much sunnier weather than we’ve had in months, I had many opportunities to head out for a field visit during October, but I left off doing so until the final weekend (I did get a lot of washing and some yard work done, though, so I’m counting it as a productive month from a non-blogging perspective).

My tardiness was then capped off by a spot of not thinking things through properly, and I decided to head to Leeton’s Fivebough Swamp for this month’s trip. I managed to forget the part where this has been a high-rainfall year, and although Fivebough is now actively managed, it has for millennia been a drainage depression below a line of hills – aka a place that catches water in high-rainfall years (I don’t know, I was distracted, the brain cells just did not connect).

I have previously blogged about visits to Fivebough in January this year and last, so you might like to compare with the photos from those visits.

Currently, the main entrance to Fivebough looks like this:

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