October-November 2018 Field Visits – Riverina Drought

My apologies for the lack of October blog post, it’s been hard to find much to blog about recently, with natural areas across the region being not really at their best, given the current drought conditions.

Today’s post will be a selection of photos I took while driving around my patch during October and November; a mixture of incidental wildlife sightings and snapshots of the drought-affected landscape.

In roughly chronological order, I present to you:

A Bearded DragonĀ (Pogona barbata) sunning itself in a driveway near Narrandera. I saw at least three of these within a two week period in various locations, which is more than I am accustomed to seeing over such a short period of time. Either I was lucky, or they’re yet another species that’s venturing closer to roads and human-inhabited spaces looking for water and food this season.

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October 2017 – Incidental Sightings

As I mentioned last month, I have been All The Busy this October, with no time to head out for a proper field visit. However, having known in advance that that would be the case, I took my camera around with me all month and tried to photograph as many incidental wildlife sightings as I could.

I got off to a great start, when a work colleague – after seeing how excited I was over last month’s nesting Tawny Frogmouth – told me where to find another that she and her dad had found while out walking. She even took a photo of the surrounding landmarks to show me so I’d be able to find the exact spot. I do work with some lovely people.

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December 2015 Field Visit – Bitterns in Rice

I started this year with a wetland visit, and I thought it fitting to end it with another, only this time I decided to look at a very different type of wetland – rice bays.

Egret in rice bay
Intermediate Egret in a rice bay near Leeton NSW

Conservation agriculture is something I am particularly interested in, for numerous reasons. One of these reasons – a very major one – is that off-park conservation is vital to the survival of a great many of our native species. Conservation actions undertaken on private land bolster those undertaken in government-managed National Parks and reserves, and often provide essential corridors of habitat connectivity across landscapes. Without off-park conservation efforts – many of which are on private land – our native species would be in an even stickier situation than they currently are, and the current situation is bad enough.

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