April 2018 Field Visit – Narrandera Common

Everything happens in April. This is just a fact of my life somehow. But! I promised I would try to go somewhere in April, and so I managed to just squeak in a late-day visit to Narrandera Common yesterday, after the annual koala count had ended.

I usually attend the koala count, but was unable to this year, but I figured I could head out there in the afternoon and at least find the beribboned trees the counters had located koalas in. In about a 2 hour period I managed to find three. The rest must have been cunningly hidden, or at least away from the trails I was following. I did speak to a local person who had participated in the count, who said they’d found a total of 29 koalas across the whole count area, so I guess I just needed to look harder for the marked trees.

While I was making my way around, looking for trees sporting ribbons and koalas, I took a few pictures of other things I saw, and just as the light was going I stopped to take some pics of a small group of kangaroos, and was super excited to see a wallaby nearby. Said wallaby was then kind enough to stay put, nearby and plainly visible, while I tried to take some photos in the fading light.

So here are my photos from my little trip to Narrandera Common yesterday:

River Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) tree - complete with mistletoe - on Snake Island in Lake Talbot
River Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) tree – complete with mistletoe – on Snake Island in Lake Talbot

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No Field Visit September 2017

Sorry folks, I didn’t manage to get out for a proper field visit this month.

I did however get these pictures of a Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides) nesting at Narrandera Common.


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August 2017 Field Visit – MIA1 & Narrandera Common

I have been so busy this month that I nearly didn’t manage a field visit, but with today being the last day of the month, the weather being nice, and my having no hugely urgent work that desperately needed to be done today, I decided to take a day off and go for a walk/drive out bush somewhere.

I further decided that ‘somewhere’ would be MIA1 – a former state forest reserve that is now part of the Murrumbidgee Valley National Park, and is located between Narrandera and Leeton. MIA1 is one of the sadly numerous reserves in the Riverina that I have spent my life driving past, but never actually visiting. I fixed that today.

Murrumbidgee Valley National Park - MIA1 Precinct
Murrumbidgee Valley National Park – MIA1 Precinct

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April 2017 Field Visit – Narrandera Koala Count

Today was the Annual Koala Count in Narrandera. I have been every year for the last several years, except when it’s been called off because of rain or flooding, and as I did last year, I decided the Count could be April’s official field visit.

One of the koalas spotted at the 2017 Annual Koala Count held at Narrandera Common
One of the koalas spotted at the 2017 Annual Koala Count held at Narrandera Common

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September 2016 Field Visit – Narrandera Common under flood

I believe I have previously mentioned that this has been an unusually wet year – well it’s gotten wetter. All the creeks across the region are over-top, as is the river in several places, and there is so much standing water in paddocks just from rainfall that it’s impossible to tell if you’re looking at flooding from a waterway or not.

I was tempted to just drive around and take photos of all the water everywhere for this month’s field trip, but in the end I decided to head to Narrandera Common, so you can compare this month’s photos with ones I’ve taken there on previous visits.

With both Bundidgerry Creek and the Murrumbidgee River to contend with, Narrandera Common currently looks like this:

Narrandera Common under flood
Little bit wet underfoot

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April 2016 Field Visit – Narrandera’s Koala Count

Every April the Narrandera Koala Regeneration Committee and the National Parks and Wildlife Service organise Narrandera’s Annual Koala Count. I was told recently that this is one of the longest-running citizen science wildlife monitoring programs in Australia (or maybe just the longest-running koala-specific one – possibly both, I’m not sure). I don’t remember how long it’s been going, but I think somewhere around 20 or 25 years.

koala
One of the koalas (Phascolarctos cinerius) spotted at the 2016 Annual Narrandera Koala Count.

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Bellowing Koala

Bonus post because IĀ attended an outdoor artistic event at Narrandera Common this weekend and was completely delighted by the amount of koala activity going on in the midst of it all. It’s currently breeding season, and while I was out there I heard at least two male koalas bellowing, andĀ several other koalas – likely females – were spotted by myself and others.

I was very pleased to get this photo of one of the males bellowing.

male-koala-bellowing

If you’ve never heard a bellowing koala, it’s quite an experience, they look far too placid to make such a noise. Here’s a Youtube video I found to give you some idea.