August 2015 Field Visit – Wattles at Pomingalarna

August means flowering wattles, so for this month’s field visit I decided to head back to Pomingalarna Park at Wagga Wagga (you may recall that I visited Pomingalarna in March this year).

Flowering wattles at Pomingalarna Park
Flowering wattles at Pomingalarna Park

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Another visit to Narrandera Common

In my first attempt to keep my promise to you and myself to try and get out more in June – and to celebrate the end of the work assignment that kept me chained to my desk every waking moment of the past two weeks – I headed back to Narrandera Common yesterday for a walk along the canal bank.

I’m not counting this as an official monthly field visit, because I did one to Narrandera Common in February, so the official June Field Visit is yet to come. Maybe count this as in lieu of April or May – especially as I had intended to visit Narrandera Common in April, for the annual koala count, which unfortunately got rained out and cancelled, and I did see some koalas yesterday (scroll down for pics).

Instead of walking through the interior of the woodland, as I did in February, I decided to walk along the canal bank this time. The Main Canal comes off of Lake Talbot at Narrandera, right next to the Common/Wildlife Reserve, and goes on to feed the Murrumbidgee and Coleambally Irrigation Areas downstream. There is a lovely broad, flat walking path along the edge of the canal for several kilometres, from the gate into the Common down to the Rocky Waterholes Footbridge. This is a very popular place for walkers as it’s a lovely easy grade and you can set your own pace, there’s no vehicular access except occasionally for maintenance (or emergency) vehicles, and you have the great experience of walking along with river red gum woodland on one side, and the canal and Lake Talbot on the other. This gives a great cross-section of bush birds and waterbirds in one place, with a high probability of seeing a koala or several, and the rather lower but not impossible chance of coming across a turtle or water-rat. Something went very loudly ‘splosh’ right behind me yesterday as I was looking at birds in the trees, and I’m disappointed that I didn’t get to see what it was. The bank is also raised higher than the floodplain the trees grow in, so you’re at lower-branch level for many trees, which brings a lot of the more arboreal wildlife closer and easier to see.

As always: click on the photos to enlarge them.

River Red Gum Woodland Narrandera
Bush on one side.
Main Canal and Lake Talbot at Narrandera
Water on the other side. (Main Canal in foreground, Lake Talbot behind)

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March 2015 Field Visit – Wagga Wagga LGA

March has been a hectic month, and I’m reporting in on the final day again. I haven’t had much chance to get out and about this month, but I did spend a couple of evenings poking around Flowerdale Lagoon and Pomingalarna Reserve at Wagga Wagga, just this week, accompanied by my dad.

Pomingalarna Reserve (aka Pomingalarna Park) is a scrubby hill reserve on the western edge of the Wagga Wagga township, and is named after a Wiradjuri woman from a local legend. The reserve is dominated by White Cypress Pine (Callitris glaucophylla), assorted Acacia species and some rather weedy-looking Inland Grey Box (Eucalyptus microcarpa) and White Box (Eucalyptus albens). The reserve is popular with mountain bike riders and is criss-crossed with trails for cyclists, walkers and horse riders to use. The Wagga Urban Landcare Group have undertaken habitat plantings for Glossy Black Cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus lathami) in parts of the reserve over the past decade, but I didn’t walk through any of these sections on this particular visit.

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Hillside scrub at Pomingalarna Park

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